Author Topic: What makes a good story writer/author?  (Read 439 times)

Sven

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Re: What makes a good story writer/author?
« Reply #15 on: June 06, 2017, 10:44:02 PM »
To be fair I think Godot pretty much baffles and confuses everybody but what I feel it must universally do is make you think.

That can only be a good thing.

It does, but as you say, it makes people think. People who have difficulties thinking tend to completely miss the point of the play and think that it is boring and stupid.


Guzman

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Re: What makes a good story writer/author?
« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2017, 09:43:10 AM »
Ummm i think i should be the one that gets to decide if i can understand/enjoy/get/comprehend a play/movie here.

Sven, with the way you post sometimes in threads like these, you come across like one of these snobby progressive rock fans who denounce all other forms of modern music and say things like "if a song dont last at least 10 mins, then it aint real music. So you just carry on listening to your simplified top 40 rock music like HIM and The Rasmus and Metallica".

This sought of thing was talked about on imdb once in the message board under the Robert Redford movie All is Lost.   It almost sounds like that what this Waiting for Godit is, is considered uninteresting and unentertaining for the same reasons All is Lost was.....in that it wasnt very engaging.    Some people found All is Lost was amazing, where as others did not (me being one of those).   The problem i found with this movie is, is the fact that there is very very little dialogue in it.   But then some people on the message board defended it with "well not everybody in the world when they are alone and doing things, even if its for their very own survival, think aloud and talk to themselves".

Thats true, but your making a movie, and people want to be entertained at the end of the day when they watch one.   Personally i think it was a risk that didnt pay off.   To me watching All is Lost was this......watch him adjust the sails.....watch him pump some water out the boat......watch him make a makeshift hammock.....watch him pump some more water out.......watch him take something out of a draw......watch him read the instructions to it.....watch him put it back in the draw......watch him open a tin and eat its contents.   I dont think i would of found Castaway with Tom Hanks as good and interesting, if he never echoed his thoughts, and got all excited when he managed to make fire by primitive means.

Like someone else said in said thread aswell, you could make a movie with the best directing, best soundscore, best cinamtography, have the greatest actor in it, but if the movie is about a person that likes to sit on his porch watching paint dry all day long......your gonna have to do something really special to make that good.   If i watch this play and dont find it entertaining, then as far as im concerned , its nothing that i have to feel ashamed of or appologise for.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2017, 09:49:16 AM by Guzman »

bababarararacucucudadada

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Re: What makes a good story writer/author?
« Reply #17 on: June 07, 2017, 10:09:32 AM »
Godot has lots of dialogue. Very little else, in fact.

You don't necessarily need much though. Clint Eastwood barely utters a word in his spaghetti westerns and they made him a superstar. Another similar film is Once Upon A Time In The West and the opening to that is stunning and there's barely a word spoken for about 15 minutes. Paris, Texas has about an hour of a man walking in a desert and it is mesmerising. The opening sequence of Up (you have probably seen that one) is equally wonderful and heartbreaking without a single word being spoken. The best bit of Wall-E is the silent bit.

You don't need dialogue in a movie because a film director has a host of techniques he can deploy to convey meaning.

Sven

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Re: What makes a good story writer/author?
« Reply #18 on: June 07, 2017, 11:52:16 PM »
Ummm i think i should be the one that gets to decide if i can understand/enjoy/get/comprehend a play/movie here.

Enjoy, sure.

Understand? Comprehend? Get?

Its not really, or actually your decision Guz. You are unfortunately limited by your own ability to these things, and I do think Waiting for Godot, would be outside your area of comprehension.
You have consistently proved your lack of understanding of the Miners Strike. While that was a serious event, involving union and political action and Godot is a play of course, I do understand why you think they may be different.
However, Godot is on one level as complex as the events surrounding the Miners Strike.

Sven, with the way you post sometimes in threads like these, you come across like one of these snobby progressive rock fans who denounce all other forms of modern music and say things like "if a song dont last at least 10 mins, then it aint real music. So you just carry on listening to your simplified top 40 rock music like HIM and The Rasmus and Metallica".
I know what you mean, but I certainly am not being like that. I am saying that you are trying to run before you can even crawl.


This sought of thing was talked about on imdb once in the message board under the Robert Redford movie All is Lost.   It almost sounds like that what this Waiting for Godit is, is considered uninteresting and unentertaining for the same reasons All is Lost was.....in that it wasnt very engaging.    Some people found All is Lost was amazing, where as others did not (me being one of those).   The problem i found with this movie is, is the fact that there is very very little dialogue in it.   But then some people on the message board defended it with "well not everybody in the world when they are alone and doing things, even if its for their very own survival, think aloud and talk to themselves".

Thats true, but your making a movie, and people want to be entertained at the end of the day when they watch one.   Personally i think it was a risk that didnt pay off.   To me watching All is Lost was this......watch him adjust the sails.....watch him pump some water out the boat......watch him make a makeshift hammock.....watch him pump some more water out.......watch him take something out of a draw......watch him read the instructions to it.....watch him put it back in the draw......watch him open a tin and eat its contents.   I dont think i would of found Castaway with Tom Hanks as good and interesting, if he never echoed his thoughts, and got all excited when he managed to make fire by primitive means.

Like someone else said in said thread aswell, you could make a movie with the best directing, best soundscore, best cinamtography, have the greatest actor in it, but if the movie is about a person that likes to sit on his porch watching paint dry all day long......your gonna have to do something really special to make that good.   If i watch this play and dont find it entertaining, then as far as im concerned , its nothing that i have to feel ashamed of or appologise for.

This is why I do not think you will get Waiting for Godot on the first watch, so I doubt you will attempt to understand it.

Even if a film is 2 hours of sitting on a porch, frequently, there is some kind of deeper meaning which can be down to interpretation or just simply can be an intention of getting a reaction from an audience.

Some films/performances are just abstract art for the sake of being abstract art.

I am not being unkind. You like action films with different stories. That is great.

You also have indicated, not deliberately, that you like to be talked through things as they go on. This is why you seem to not quite understand pieces without dialogue.

That is not the reason I doubt you will get Waiting for Godot though.

It is entirely dialogue, but I get a strong feeling, you may not follow the dialogue.

Guzman

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Re: What makes a good story writer/author?
« Reply #19 on: June 08, 2017, 07:22:13 PM »
Ok, im just gonna clear up a few misconceptions about me here.

I can enjoy a movie (or play) where it is pretty much all about dialogue.  There doesnt have to be plenty of action, eye candy, sex, impressive looking machineries and scenery for me to enjoy a movie.  Burried, starring Ryan Reynolds  , wouldent you consider that movie to be all about the script and dialouge?.  The whole movie is about a man in a coffin for 90s mins talking on the phone and it never shows anything from outside the coffin.  I enjoyed watching that, even though i dont consider it as good as other movies of its ilk, because it spent too much time pushing out political undertones instead of purely concentrating on a story about the protagonist trying to free himself from the life threatening imminent danger he is in.

9 Dead.....that movie is all about the script and dialouge aswell (apart from the first 10 mins of it). 9 people held hostage in a room, they all have to get to know each other, tell each other what work they have all been doing for the last 2 years, confess to each other all their wrong doings they have done, because they all have to figure out why they have been brought there against their will within 90 mins, where the antagonist gave them no clue at all.

The second thing i wanna clear up aswell is, Sven, why are you stubbornly applying the motion to me that what i love watching the most are flashy in yer face action movies?.   Its thrillers i mainly like.

Quote
You also have indicated, not deliberately, that you like to be talked through things as they go on. This is why you seem to not quite understand pieces without dialogue.

You cannnot use that as substance to declare that that was the reason i did not particularly enjoy All Is Lost.   There was only one thing that needed to be understood from that movie....that a man stranded out in the middle of the ocean had suffered critical damage on his yacht and he had to do all he could to summon help and survive.   Ive already explained the reason as to why this movie being almost no dialouge ruined it imo, so im not going to repeat myself here.

Maybe i wont get Waiting for Godot the first time i watch it, but then who is to say that you yourself didnt get it the first time through and your just pretending you did, not like me or anyone else on this forum can prove it.

I think some movies out there are just simply all about "you either get it or you dont" and its as simple as that.  Where it doesnt boil down to the individuals IQ, academic or intelligence level.  Two movies where i think that is the case are Clockwork Orange and Rocky Horror Picture Show.

bababarararacucucudadada

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Re: What makes a good story writer/author?
« Reply #20 on: June 08, 2017, 08:53:11 PM »
I've never seen Clockwork Orange.

I have seen the RHPS loads of times though and to be honest there isn't a lot to get if you watch it on video or on TV. You need to be there, really.

I'd use RHPS as an example of something truly ground-breaking in a similar way to The Beach Boys Good Vibrations. Before them there was nothing vaguely like either and both blew cultural barriers to smithereens.

It is hard for me to grasp how significant they were because they have always been there in my life. I have no memory of what it was like previous to them.

RHPS is what it is because it was a huge, blatant, ludicrous, camp romp through the old Hammer horror genre with as much sex, preferably homosexual but bisexual where it didn't fit the plot (such as it is), as possible sprinkled liberally with great tunes.

This all seems a bit passť now but I'm not sure that homosexuality was even legal in this country when it came out - and if it was it was only just and the age of consent was 21. The impact was seismic.

Go and see it in a cinema or, better still, a theatre. Only then can you even begin to get it.