Author Topic: My definition of what a "movie plot" is  (Read 85 times)

Guzman

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 235
My definition of what a "movie plot" is
« on: May 24, 2017, 09:03:08 AM »
I will say this right off.....my own personal definition of what defines a "plot for a movie" is a rather strict one, and i think its more strict than most peoples definition of what defines a movie plot.   The reason i have made this thread is because, when i made a thread on here recently where in order to help make my point, i mentioned the movie Casablanca, one critisism i made about Casablanca was "that until Ingrid Bergman's character appears in the movie, there isnt really a plot", and someone on here debunked me for that (but in a polite way).

For me, what defines a movie plot is the very second the movie begins to start unfolding its actual storyline.  In Casablanca the storyline is, Humphry Bogarts character runs a drinking establishment in Casablanca Morocco, but while he is doing that, a woman that he had a romantic relationship with in France during the early part of the war comes to Casablanca on business of her own.  Her and Humphry Bogart become re-aquainted, but Humphry Bogart is unhappy she is back, because he felt like she abandoned him just like that with no courtesy of an explanation (almost like an abandoned at the alter sought of feeling) , so therefore her being back is only going to do nothing but re open old wounds, and no good can come of it.

While she is back he learns that she was married all along, but at the time she had good reason to pressume her husband had died in the line of duty.  Her husband has come back to Casablanca with her.  Humphry Bogart gets the chance to have her husband captured by the authorities meaning that he could have her back and all to himself again, but instead of doing that, he double crosses the authorities and makes the unselfish decision to allow her and her husband to escape, because he needs her more than he does and that a greater good will come out of it.

Before the point Ingrid Bergman's character comes into Casablanca, none of that story has unfolded.  All it does is just shows activity going on in the streets and inside Bogarts bar.....giving us the view that Bogart is a charismatic popular and respected publican, and alsorts of people come to his bar at night.   The police, army members, members of the public, tradesmen,sailors, the lot.  This is what i call "scene setting" or "setting up the scene".

Very very very few movies will start unfolding the plot immediately, and they can be forgiven for not doing so.  As of now i can only name one movie that unfolds the plot right away, and that is The Warriors (1979).  Most movies will take 10-20 mins for it, some even as long as 30 mins, and few will go on longer than 40 mins before it does so.  Before that point, they will do what i call scene setting.  In Rambo 1, you get a bit of scene setting at the beginning.  It shows the towns sherrif ask a local in social conversation how did his son do in the school hockey tournament?.  This is setting up a scene that the town is a small town community where everybody knows each others business's, its not strictly speaking unfolding a storyline, its just giving you a scene to begin working with before kicking into the storyline.

In my own opinion, a movie should never take more than 30 mins max before it kicks into the plot.

If a thriller movie was based around murders happening on a beach, at the begining of the movie it would show you much scene and stock footage of people swimming, playing beach volleyball, people fishing, people scuba diving, guys and gals hanging around drinking and listening to music and partying.  This is just giving you the idea that is a popular beach that attracts alot of leisure, its not kicking into a storyline.

This is why i did not like the mad max movie.  I watched it for 30-40 mins and it didnt even begin to start unfolding a plot.  Even Cinemasins critisised it for that.  Hostel takes nearly a whole hour before it actually kicks into the plot.   And yes in another thread i made about movies, someone attacked me for critisising a movie because of my own admission of saying i didnt see it all.   Well this concept here was established by a fair few of us on IMDB......that a movie is not immune from critisism just because all of it has not been watch.   Do you have to watch the entire 1hr and 20 min lenght of a Russel Brand stand up DVD to decide for yourself that he aint funny?.  Point made. 

That same person also attacked me by throwing the notion onto me that im only into wham bam shoot shoot shoot action movies with little story to them, and that movies with in-depthness to them in story and character development are obviously out of my league and depth.  Hmmm yeah, that same notion wasnt thrown onto me before by a few members of IMDB in the past  ::)  come to think of it, i wonder if he was one of them all along? , cut from the same cloth.

Actually contrary to that notion, a storyline is very important to me in a movie.  And believe it or not, one of my favourite generes is Thriller movies, especially real time thriller movies of people trapped or isolated somewhere under a critical or life threatning condition, like 9 Dead, Exam, Killing Jar, Phone Booth, Frozen (not the disney movie), The Grey, Saw 1 and to a lesser extent Burried.  For me to consider a movie great and marvellous, it must have a good storyline, or nothing else will matter.  You definently cannot fault 9 Dead for its script or storyline.

bababarararacucucudadada

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 870
Re: My definition of what a "movie plot" is
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2017, 09:13:38 AM »
Didn't I read this yesterday?

Guzman

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 235
Re: My definition of what a "movie plot" is
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2017, 10:44:09 AM »
You did, but i came to the realisation that it wasnt gonna get much attention in my blog thread.

bababarararacucucudadada

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 870
Re: My definition of what a "movie plot" is
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2017, 10:53:57 AM »
Well I'll reference Up again then. See his blog for why.