Author Topic: The Velvet Underground  (Read 110 times)

bababarararacucucudadada

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The Velvet Underground
« on: May 21, 2017, 01:36:33 AM »
Funny old band.

When I was much younger they were the band the cool kids always said "you have to listen to this". Andy Warhol. The banana. Songs not even slightly disguised as being about heroin. They were right out there on the edge and as that mighty philosopher Joe Pasquale once said "if you're not living on the edge then you're taking up too much room" but I digress.

That was back on the cusp of the 70s/80s though. By then we'd had Woodstock, Altamont, Bowie, Punk and Hawkwind had been preaching acid-tinged drop-out anarchy for a good decade. The boundaries had long since been either blown apart or set so distant they barely existed anymore.

When I look back beyond that it is like cultural archaeology. I wasn't there or at least I wasn't old enough to pay attention to what was happening so I have to interpret the signs because the thrill of that particular new will forever be denied to me.

So what were the high water marks of the cultural revolutions? Sgt Pepper is always named as one, and rightly so, but that was released in 1967. Pet Sounds, also rightly so, is another and that was also 1967 (I think)...

I need to digress here, sorry, but Good Vibrations was on Pet Sounds. The only tech they had was 4 track. How the hell did anybody even imagine that song let alone create it? I know it is old hat now. The Beach Boys are kind of a bit hoary and wrinkly ("they didn't even surf!" etc) but for me that song has always been there. I can't really imagine what it was like before it was and then you get to hear it as a brand new song... it must have sounded like it was off another planet (kind of like Are Friends Electric? did for my generation but more so). In an instant horizons were changed and goal posts were moved. Nothing could ever be the same again.

1967 again: The Who's I Can See For Miles.

1967 again: Hendrix. The whole damned shooting match.

But even before then there was the early The Pink Floyd. Sid Barrett became their frontman in '65! It might have taken them a while to hit DSotM status megafame but they were as dangerous an underground band as there has been in this country for a while (which is often overlooked these days).

Which brings me back to the Velvets who were formed in '64. '64! It doesn't seem possible that while The Beatles were recording It's Hard Day's Night then so The Velvets were starting their trek through all kinds of bizarre counter-cultural behaviour.

They were soooooo far ahead of the curve it is no wonder they barely sold a record!

Which brings me to my reasoning for starting this thread. There's a whole bunch of Velvet-hued music out there so what songs, not VU ones (and Lou Reed is barred too), are definitely very VU flavoured when you hear them?

Here's one:
! No longer available


Here's another:
! No longer available


There must be loads. The Doors, The Cure, Siouxsie, Echo & The Bunnymen and hordes of others have plundered the "Velvet sound" but I can't bloody think of them so let's be having you... Suggestions please!
« Last Edit: May 21, 2017, 01:45:42 AM by bababarararacucucudadada »

Q13.1

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Re: The Velvet Underground
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2017, 11:25:14 AM »
Good morning all :)


Q13.1

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Re: The Velvet Underground
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2017, 12:12:58 PM »
Quote
The values that made The Velvet Underground such pariahs in the 60s the do-it-yourself, under-produced record-making; the utter disregard for fashion; the sceptical, sometimes cynical attitude were right in line with 70s punk, 80s indie rock and 90s alternative music.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/culture/story/20131125-do-the-velvets-beat-the-beatles